business card tutorial in inkscapeorg

Inkscape

This tutorial will demonstrate how to create a business card template using Inkscape. The steps in this tutorial will work for Inkscape versions 0.46 and 0.47.

  1. Creating The Template
    1. Importing the PDF template
    2. Converting to Guides
    3. Configuring Snapping
    4. Creating the Rectangle
    5. Creating the Clones
  2. A Sample Business Card Design
    1. Creating the Background Gradient
    2. Creating the Background Pattern
    3. Adding Text

Creating The Template

Importing the PDF template

For the purposes of this tutorial, the stock for our business cards we will be the Worldlabel 3.5″ x 2″ Business Card.

Download the PDF template from the Worldlabel website: http://www.worldlabel.com/Templates/wl-ol244PDF.htm.

Launch Inkscape, and open up the PDF template using the File > Open... menu item. After opening up the file, the PDF Import Settings dialog box will appear. As illustrated below, use the default settings and press OK.

PDF import settings

PDF import settings

Your document should now have the template visible, similar to the image below. Now, go to File > Save As... and save your document in the native Inkscape format, SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics).

Initial Template Import

1.2. Converting to Guides

The next step is to convert the lines that make up the template into Inkscape guides. The template object that was imported from the PDF may be in a group. To convert the template to guides, we first need to ungroup the lines that make up the template. Go to Edit > Select All to select all the objects, then choose Object > Ungroup twice. The document should look similar to this:

Initial Import

Note

Now, keep the lines selected, and choose Object > Objects To Guides from the menu. The original black lines have now been replaced with blue guide lines:

Convert to Guides

The next step is to double check the Inkscape’s snapping preferences.

Important

1.3.1. Configuring Snapping for Inkscape 0.46

Open up the Document Properties dialog by going to File > Document Properties... in the menu. Select the Snap tab and configure the preferences as per the screenshot below:

Snapping Preferences

With these preferences configured properly, when an object is moved or resized near the guides, the object should “snap” cleanly to the edge of the guide(s).

1.3.2. Configuring Snapping for Inkscape 0.47

Open up the Document Properties dialog by going to File > Document Properties... in the menu. Select the Snap tab and configure the preferences as per the screenshot below:

Select Snapping Preferences

The main difference in Inkscape 0.47 is that a Snap Controls Bar was introduced. It is essentially a bar of toggle controls that control the snapping options. Having the buttons toggled as per the following screenshot will create the snapping behavior needed for this tutorial:

Snap Controls Bar

1.4. Creating the Rectangle

  1. Select the Rectangle tool from the Inkscape Toolbox on the left hand side of the main Inkscape window.

    Select Rectangle Tool

  2. Draw a small rectangle on the canvas within the guides of the top left Business Card area of the template.

    Draw Rectangle

  3. Choose the Select tool from the tool box, and select the rectangle that you drew with it. The rectangle should have arrows around it like the following screenshot:

    Choose Select Tool

  4. Resize the rectangle to fit the business card shape defined by the guides. While resizing, the rectangle should automatically snap out to the inner edges of the guides.

    Note

    Resize Rectangle

  5. For the clones that we are going to create to function properly, our rectangle needs to be in a group. Select the rectangle using the Select tool.

    Note

    Now place the rectangle into a group with Object > Group from the menu. The statusbar at the bottom of the Inkscape window should now read:

    Group of 1 object in layer OL244. Click selection to toggle scale/rotation handles.
  1. Select the rectangle (which is actually a group), and create a clone of it using Edit > Clone > Create Clone from the menu. This will create a linked clone of the object. Make sure the clone is selected by checking the statusbar for the following message:
    Clone Of: Group of 1 object in layer OL244. Use Shift + D to look up original.
  2. Now move the newly created clone to another business card slot on the template. The clone should snap cleanly into place:

    Move Clone

  3. Go back to the original rectangle that was created, and repeat the cloning process until all 10 slots of the template have rectangles in them. Try to always keep the original rectangle in the top left slot of the template.

    Move Clone

    Note

    When you have finished this step, the document should look like the following screenshot:

    Finished Clones

  4. Now check that the clones have been created correctly by entering the group, and changing the color of the rectangle. First, select the original (it should still be in the top left slot) and double click on it to enter the group. After double clicking, the selection cues (the bounding box and arrows) will disappear. Click on the rectangle again and the statusbar message should have changed to: (the “#G1234″ value will be different):
    Rectangle in layer #G1234

    Now change the color of the rectangle using the palette at the bottom of the screen. If the clones have been created properly, the color of every object should change automatically.

    Note

    Check Clones

2. A Sample Business Card Design

The second section of this tutorial will outline a sample process for using the newly created template to Design a Business Card.

2.1. Creating the Background Gradient

As was done in the final step of creating the template, select the original (it should still be in the top left slot) and double click on it to enter the group. After double clicking, the selection cues (the bounding box and arrows) will disappear. Click on the rectangle again and the statusbar message should have changed to: (the “#G1234″ value will be different):

Rectangle in layer #G1234

Now, select the gradient tool from the toolbar:

Select Gradient Tool

Now, click and drag a line on the rectangle, creating the gradient:

Create Gradient

Click on the top node of the gradient. (This selects the node, making it blue like the screenshot below).

Select Top Gradient Node

Open the Fill / Stroke dialog (Object > Fill / Stroke from the menu), and choose the fill color for the top node of your gradient. (in this example, the color that is used is #cc0000ff)

Fill Dialogue

The gradient color will have changed:

Gradient Change

Follow the same process, and change the color for the bottom node of the gradient (in this example, the bottom color that is used is #a40000ff). The canvas should look like:

Gradient Color Change

2.2. Creating the Background Pattern

In the next step, a striped background pattern will be added to the business card.

Choose the select tool from the tool bar:

Choose the Select Tool

Next, duplicate the rectangle (Edit > Duplicate from the menus), and open the Fill / Stroke dialog again. In the Fill / Stroke dialog, choose the pattern fill type, and set the pattern to “Stripes 1:1 White”. In the same dialog, set the “Opacity (%)” slider at the bottom to 10%:

Select Pattern

The result will look similar to:

Results

2.3. Adding Text

The final step in the business card design is to add text.

Select the Text Tool from the side Toolbar:

Select the Text Tool

Click once on the canvas to insert an unflowed text object, and type in some text.

Type in Text

Important

After entering in the text, choose the select tool, and use the arrows that surround the text object to resize it.

Resize Text

The letters in an unflowed text object can be manually kerned. Choose the Text tool again and place the cursor between the letters that need to be moved. Next, hold down the ALT key, and press an Arrow key. Use this technique to manually fine tune the position of the letters:

Refine Text

Repeat this process to add multiple text objects to fill out the business card:

Repeat Process

Finally, zoom out, and admire the finished business cards, ready to be printed.

The Finished Product

Author is Ryan Lerch of http://ryanler.wordpress.com/

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